Background Camp Kenya has been working with the communities of Makongeni and Muhaka for 9 and 4 years respectively, to improve living standards and access to educational resources for local people through it‰Ûªs volunteer programmes. In this part of Kenya, it‰Ûªs estimated that around 70% of people are living below the poverty line and do not have access to proper educational facilities or healthcare. Many children live in unsanitary conditions where many are suffering from debilitating intestinal worm infestations and diarrhoea, resulting in stunted development and disease in young children. Those under 5 years of age are most at risk. Lack of proper medical facilities, poor nutrition and inadequate public and personal health education further compound the problem. Figure 1. 2010-2011 figures for Muhaka dispensary. March 2011 – Launched the first Anti-jigger campaign in Kwale In March, Camp Kenya partnered with a national initiative to provide anti-jiggers treatment to the people of Makongeni and surrounding villages. Jiggers is a painful parasitic infection, most commonly affecting the feet, caused by the chigoe flea (Tunga penetrans). If left untreated it can lead to more serious secondary infections, expensive medical bills and loss of study time for children. It also increases the risk of spreading HIV as people share the needles that they use to remove the flea larvae. Although Camp Kenya has been treating jiggers on a small scale for a number of years, the number of cases this year has been significantly higher. Ahadi Kenya and Safaricom donated medication and in one day, with the help of our volunteers, we successfully treated 280 children. Say No To Jiggers! Healthcare Outreach Expedition In November 2011, 25 dedicated volunteers from the medical profession travelled from the UK to Kenya in order to take part in our pioneering new programme. The group comprised mainly practice nurses, but also GP‰Ûªs and healthcare assistants. Over the course of two weeks, they ran 8 free medical clinics for the local community, providing treatment and advise on nutrition, sexual health and hygiene, but with their main focus onåÊ the treatment and eradication of jiggers. Mak15 Here are just some of their achievements: å´åÊ The team ran 8 clinics in the villages of Makongeni, Muhaka, Madago, Fihoni, Kilole, Mkwambani, Magaoni and Zigira å´åÊ During the course of 2 weeks, the team successfully treated 7,444 medical incidencesåÊ (see figure 2) å´åÊ In one day the team managed to treat 150 children and over 500 adults! The volunteers also treated as many houses as they could and provided flip flops to the children to avoid re-infection Figure 2. The number of medical incidences treated during the expedition. Many people were treated for 3 or 4 different ailments at the same time and every patient was de-wormed. The Future Following the overwhelming success of this year‰Ûªs expedition, we have already launched two expeditions for 2012, one in Kenya and one in Cambodia. Our long-term vision is to be able to provide this programme in all our destinations, particularly Tanzania and Cambodia, to provide clinics at all our camps and to provide medical support to the community on a more regular basis. Improving the community dispensary Muhaka dispensary was opened in 1943 and until recently has been the only dispensary to serve 18,000 people in this area. The dispensary has no ambulance and thus the community depends on Msambweni district hospital for emergency cases. At times the dispensary treats patients who need quick attention before referral but there is no room to keep them for observation or emergency rest. Even if patients are physically able to travel to the main hospital independently, the cost of transport makes it virtually impossible for them. Camp Kenya‰Ûªs next priority is to improve the infrastructure of the dispensary so that it can provide a more comprehensive service for its patients. (For more information on how you can help, please visit the Camps International Foundation HERE) THANK YOU A special thanks to the local government authorities of Kwale District and the dedication of the nurses visiting from the UK. In addition, we would like to thank the following for their generous contributions towards the purchase of medication of which it would not have been possibe to treat as many people as we did: Harley’s Limited Kinondo Kwetu Sai Pharmaceuticals Rafiki Kenia Ahadi Kenya Trust And a big thanks to Megan Cook, Pat Bogue, Alison Thayne (aka Happy Feet!) and everyone else that made a contribution in one form or the other…